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WINE

ARBOREA

The name of this wine comes from the homonymous town built in 1928 and located in the middle of a fertile plain extended for 20.000 hectares on the western coast of Sardinia, facing the Oristano's Gulf.
These lands are characterized by a warm climate and a good irrigation: main factors for a successful growing of the vineyards.
For the grape growing, producers continue the tradition which finds its origins in1750: in this period, in fact, the Piedmonteses brought successfully the variety
Sangiovese.
Another variety is cultivated: the Trebbiano.
Both of these grapes can guarantee a constant quality and an abundant production.
The wine's pleasant, fruity, easy to drink; the aging is not required.
It obtained the DOC classification in 1987; other varieties can never exceed the 15%.
It comes in the following types:
Sangiovese Rosé;
Sangiovese Red;
Trebbiano Dry, White;
Trebbiano Sweet, White;
Sparkling Trebbiano Dry, White;
Sparkling Trebbiano Sweet, White.

CAMPIDANO DI TERRALBA

Terralba is a flourishing agricultural town placed in Campidano plane, where vineyards are grown, as well as cereals and vegetables.
Actually the wine has obtained a prominent position in time.
The production of "Rosso di Terralba" wine is supplied by grape-varieties with the characteristic of a good alchoolic content and an aromatic sharpness; the grapes grow
in a marshland cleared about 50 years ago.
The introduction of new and more rational installations had an important rôle as well the adoption of training techniques more "expansive" than the traditional alberello
sardo system, for obtaining this pleasant wine, once too alcoholic and aggressive.
Grape-varieties comes from Bovale species: Bovale Sardo, Bovale Mannu, Bovale of Spain ; the wine is produced in a lot of communes in Cagliari's province and before
receiving the D.O.C. it used to be exported to the whole Italy and France as blending wine.
No more than 20% of other varieties ( Pascale, Gregu Nieddu, Monica) can complete it.
It only comes in one type: Dry, Red, aged of 5 months.

CANNONAU

The Cannonau is the most famous sardinian red wine. D'Annunzio appreciated and celebrated the famous Nepente, a Cannonau variety of the Oliena zone. According to some experts, (recently we had many confirmations about this theory) the growing of Cannonau dates back to the nuragic period; others say it's a variation of Cannonazo of Seville or Granaxa of Aragona, brought during the spanish domination; it could be also a variety of the Alicante, brought from the Jesuites.
 In France it's called Grenache.
 Cannonau is cultivated pratically on the whole island but the central areas are its ideal habitat: Ogliastra, Barbagia of Nuoro and Barbagia of Dorgali, where it reaches the
 50% of all the vine cultivations.
 Despite this popularity the quantity is not very large: product quantity per hectare is about 50 quintals, while the maximum allowed is of 100 quintals.
 The most of this product is prepared to supply the table wine market, even if it has a rather high alchool content (13.5°).
 Traditional growing method adopted is the "alberello", while in recent times the "spur pruned cordon" tecnique gives very good results.
 The particular refined flavor and fragrance of Cannonau changes from area to area; it almost always has a warm flavor, with an aftertaste which is similar to the bitter
 taste of dark chocolate.
 Nowadays, through modern technologies, this wine is almost all bottled after a brief aging period (about one year) in vintage wooden casks.
 Its over ripe grapes give the "Anghelu Ruju", famous for its character and elegance.
 Other varieties of grapes which complete the wine can't be up to 10%.
 The aging required is 1 year; we find the following typologies:
      Dry: Red;
      Sweet: Red;
      Liqueur-like Sweet Natural: Red;
      Liqueur-like Dry Natural: Red;
      Riserva Dry (15°minimum): Red, with 3 years of aging;
      Riserva Sweet: Red, with 3 years of aging;
      Superiore Natural Sweet: Red, with 2 years of aging;
      Superiore Natural Dry: Red, with 2 years of aging;
      Dry: Rosé, with 1 year of aging.

CARIGNANO

The Sulcis area has been one of the first sites in which the Phoenicians settled, they started straight away to produce wine to commercialize around the coasts of the Mediterraneo, although we can't be sure the Carignano is, actually, a local species of vine.
The study of the local dialects suggests that this variety comes from the centre of Carifera in Aragona, where Carignano spread under different names: in France (Carignan), in Algeria and in Tunisia.
The Sulcis area, as well as Sant'Antioco's and San Pietro islands are the best areas for this strong variety that loves particular winds coming from the sea, rich in mineral
salts.
The wine is ample and robust, with high alcoholic content: for this reason in the past it has been exported as blending wine to complete the structure of light wines made in most famous areas.
The yeld per hectare doesn't exceed 60 quintals and most of the times the wine gets kept in casks during which time it improves in quality: the intense ruby colour, the fragrances of prunes and currants, the taste warm, intense and mellow.
The wine obtained the DOC classification in 1977 and is marketed under the name "Carignano del Sulcis".
The varieties that can complete this wine can't exceed the 15%; it comes in different types:
     Dry, Rosè; 
     Dry, Red, with 5 months of aging required;
     Reserve: Dry, Red, with two years of aging.

GIRO'

The girò is also one of grape-varieties brought by spanish during their domination, but its best period was during the piedmontese domination, to be prescise in 1736 when the marquis of Rivarolo boosted the increase and improvement of vine growing through a new policy.
Girò has been successfully planted until the arrival of phylloxera around 1850, when all vineyards had beeen destroyed.
Whilst planting wine growers chose species of vine easier to grow and to produce, so people started getting interested on this wine only after being recognised as DOC in 1979.
Today it's planted in the areas nearby Cagliari and in several towns of Oristano district; it's one of the more appreciated dessert wines: in fact, it constantly obtains important recognitions abroad.
The colour is light and brilliant ruby, its flavors are delicate of fresh grape, its taste is soft and velvety.
The aging required is 9 months, and it comes in different types:
Natural Sweet, Red;
Liqueur-like Natural Sweet, Red;
Reserve: Liqueur-like Natural Sweet, Red, with 2 years of aging;
Liqueur-like Dry, Red;
Reserve: Liqueur-like Dry, Red, with 2 years of aging;
Dry, Red.

MALVASIA DI BOSA

The grape-variety Malvasia was brought in Sardinia thanks to the Benedictine monks from Monembasia, a greek town in Morea's district during the Byzantine age.
The Malvasia cultivated in Sardinia is typically local and is very different from the many other Italian Malvasias.
In Sardinian language it's called with names as Marmaxia, Manusia, Alvagreca.
It's cultivated also in Cagliari areas but it's in Bosa areas, in the western part of the island (in the province of Nuoro) that this variety finds the best conditions to grow and achieves particular quality.
In fact, in Bosa areas this wine gets particular delicacy and fragrances thanks to the soil, poor in nitrogen but rich in potassium and well exposed to the sun.
The grapes which make the typical "Malvasia di Bosa" wine come from the variety "Malvasia di Sardegna" and grow in the districts of Suni, Tinnura, Flussio, Magomadas, Tresnuraghes, Modolo. The main centre is Bosa, in the north-west coast of the island: a small town where overlooks the ancient Castle of Serravalle, built in the XIII century by the Malaspina Marquis to defend the area from Saracens incursions.
The grapes are harvested before they mature; its colour goes from straw-yellow to golden; its fragrance is intense and aromatic; its taste's dry, very savory and warm.
The aging required is of 2 years.
It comes in different typologies:
Sweet Natural, White (13° plus 2° to ferment);
Sweet Natural Liqueur-like, White
Liqueur-like, Dry, White
Dry, White.

MALVASIA DI CAGLIARI

The grape-variety Malvasia was brought in Sardinia thanks to the Benedictine monks from Monembasia, a greek town in Morea's district during the Byzantine age.
The Malvasia cultivated in Sardinia is typically local and is very different from the many other Italian Malvasias.
In Sardinian language it's called with names as Marmaxia, Manusia, Alvagreca.
It's cultivated also in Cagliari areas but it's in Bosa areas, in the western part of the island (in the province of Nuoro) that this variety finds the best conditions to grow and achieves particular quality.
In fact, in Bosa areas this wine gets particular delicacy and fragrances thanks to the soil, poor in nitrogen but rich in potassium and well exposed to the sun.
The grapes are harvested before they mature; the wine colours go from straw-yellow to golden; its fragrances are intense and aromatic; its taste's dry, very savory and warm.
Unlike Malvasia di Bosa, the Malvasia di Cagliari develops more intense fragrances and savours and a slight aftertaste of bitter almonds.
The grape-variety is cultivated in many districts of Cagliari province; the best results come from Settimo S.Pietro and Sinnai areas.
In the district of Oristano the best results come from Lunamatrona and Collinas areas.
The aging required is 9 months; it comes in different typologies:
Sweet Natural, White;
Liqueur-like, Sweet Natural, White;
Riserva: Liqueur-like, Sweet Natural (15° plus 2° to ferment);
White, with 2 years of aging in casks;
Liqueur-like, Dry, White (14.5° plus 2° to ferment);
Riserva: Liqueur-like, White, Dry (16.5° plus 1° to ferment).

MANDROLISAI

Mandrolisai is a DOC wine bears the same name of the area of cultivation it comes from, situated between the Barbagia (geographical zone near Nuoro) and districts which include Samugheo's province.
This wine is a blend of three grape-variety: Cannonau (20-35%), Monica (20-35%) and most of all, Bovale, which make it so special.
The Bovale has been probably imported by the Aragoneses during their domination in XVIII century a.C. and since then it's been called "Muristellu": sardinian wine-growers appreciate it a lot for its adaptability to particular difficoult climates of growing zones and to granitic lands.
Vineyards are about 400 and 600 meters of height, surrounded by forests of olms, oaks and cork-forests.
The wine's fragrance ethereal, the taste's velvety and a slightly bitter aftertaste.
No aging is required; it comes in different typologies:
Rosé, Dry;
Red, Dry;
Superiore: Red, Dry, with 2 years of aging.

MONICA DI SARDEGNA

Although if we find this grape-variety only in Sardinia, we are sure that it's not an autocthonous variety: the Spanish originally brought it around the 1600 a.C. under the name "Morillo", later known with the name "Mora" and, after some linguistic influences, Monica.
This grape-variety is known as "Nieddera Manna" (Black Big), for its grapes, "Nieddera de Ispagna" (Black of Spain) and Monaca; in some places of inland zones it's still called Morillo.
Its cultivation is extended over almost the entire isle, but it gives the best results in the middle and southern part of the isle; it prefers hilly areas with an average slope wich are exposed to the sun.
Monica di Sardegna is a D.O.C. table wine with 12°- 12,5°, and it can be served with any food; it colour's ligh red, delicate fragrances, fresh and soft tastes, a good body.
The Monica vineyards almost always combine other varieties of grapes (15% max of non-aromatic autorized black-grape vines) which tend to increase its character.
The aging period required is of six months. It comes in the following types:
Dry, Red;
Dry, Sparkling, Red;
Superiore: Dry, Red, aging of one year and with 12,5° minimum.

MONICA DI CAGLIARI

These types of grape-variety have only been found in Sardinia, we are pretty sure they don'treally come fron there: Spanish introduced them during the 1600 a.C. under the name of"Morillo"that turned into "Mora" and, after some linguistic influences, Monica.
This grape-variety is known as "Nieddera Manna" (Black Big), for its grapes, "Nieddera de Ispagna" (Black of Spain) and Monaca; in some places of inland zones it's still called Morillo.
Its cultivation is extended over almost the entire isle, but it gives the best results in the middle and southern part of the isle, in the Campidano plane and in the province of Cagliari.
The grapes, left to dry on plants, make a sweet and excellent wine, so much that Vodret (one of the most important specialists in sardinian wines) said : "I wouldn't know which words to use to recognize this renowned wine from others".
Monica di Cagliari is a D.O.C. wine with more body and alchool than Monica of Sardegna, thanks to slight drying of the grape on the vine.
Its color is pale ruby which tends to become orange with aging; the fragrance is floral and intense, the taste is savory and vaguely it might recall the wine Malaga but it's more mellow and velvety than that one.
The aging required is of nine months and it comes in different typologies:
Natural Sweet, Red;
Liquoroso Natural Sweet, Red;
Reserve: Liquoroso, Natural Sweet, Red, aging of two years (one in cask);
Liquoroso Dry, Red;
Reserve: Liquoroso Dry, Red, aging of two years (one in cask);
Dry, Red.

MOSCATO DI SARDEGNA

This grape-variety has been brought to Sardinia by Benedictine monks at the end of the Roman empire, during the byzantine age (550 a.C.).
The white variety is the most cultivated nowadays with different names: Muscadellu Sardu, Muscatellò, Muscatellone, Muscadeddu de Ispagna, Nussadeddu.
The wine Moscato di Sardegna is a sparkling wine.
The grape-variety for this wine just covers a few dozen of hectares placed in the Campidano plane near Cagliari and in other zones as Parteolla, Gallura, Anglona (in the northern part of Sassari province), Mandrolisai (in Nuoro's province, where the red variety is cultivated).
Vineyards are dislocated between 200 and 500 meters above the sea: this reason explains the characteristic fresh and fruity "bouquet".
Unlike Moscato di Sorso-Sennori and Moscato di Cagliari, the grapes are harvested normally.
The final results of this "spumantizzazione" are always differents, but we can't reveal certain "secrets" of vinification as winegrowers are very jealous of their traditions.
The aging is not required, and it comes in one typology: Dry, White, Spumante.

MOSCATO DI CAGLIARI

This grape-variety has been brought to Sardinia by Benedictine monks at the end of the Roman empire, during the byzantine age (550 a.C.).
The white variety is the most cultivated nowadays with different names: Muscadellu Sardu, Muscatellò, Muscatellone, Muscadeddu de Ispagna, Nussadeddu.
Unlike Malvasia, the most important conditions to preserve and to express the characters of this wine is the presence of an high percent of natural sugar.
The production zones are the hilly areas of Marmilla, Parteolla, Trexenta, the lowlands of Sulcis, the S. Antioco isle and the zone around Cagliari's province.
The "alberello" method of growing characterizes these vineyards; the harvest starts late for obtaining a bigger natural sugar concentration.
Unfortunately the area of cultivation of this grape covers only a few dozens of hectars; the wine is very appreciated all over the world but really, its production is not enough to cope with the island needs.
All the Moscato wines are different because each winegrower gets his "secrets" of vinification.
The aging required is of 5 months and one year for the "liqueur-like" starting from fortification (which then acquires the qualification "reserve"); it comes in different typologies:
Sweet Natural, White;
Liqueur-like Sweet Natural, White (15° plus 2.5° to ferment);
Reserve: Liqueur-like Sweet Natural, White.

MOSCATO DI SORSO-SENNORI

This grape-variety has been brought to Sardinia by Benedictine monks at the end of the Roman empire, during the byzantine age (550 a.C.).
The white variety is the most cultivated nowadays with different names: Muscadellu Sardu, Muscatellò, Muscatellone, Muscadeddu de Ispagna, Nussadeddu.
The vine growing can be found around the area of Sorso and Sennori, in the north-west part of Sardinia, in the zones between Castelsardo and Porto Torres; unfortunately the area of cultivation covers just a few dozen of hectares .
The harvest begins when grapes are over-riped and slightly "passito", the must ferments and decants in casks several times; fermentation is stopped with filtration or with addition of wine-alcohol for the typology "liqueur-like".
Its colour is from straw-yellow to bright golden yellow; the fragrance's plentful, delicate, intense and the the taste's full, rounded and savory.
The aging period required is of 5 months; it comes in two typologies:
White, Sweet;
Liquoroso, White, Sweet.

NASCO DI CAGLIARI

The Nasco wine has been the first sardinian wine to be praised from wine experts because the best products come from the original grape's growing zone (the Campidano area).
It is believed that Nasco is native of these places, even if its official history dates back to the Genoeses and Pisans in the isle (XIII c.a.C.); it has been called "Nascu", from the latin "Muscus" that means "Moss", because of its characteristic fragrances.
In fact, people that taste Nasco wine get struck by fragrances of fresh grapes which gently alternate fragrances of underwood; the taste's velvety and keep a little of slight bitter.
Even Mameli, poet and patriot said about this wine: " It doesn't exist another wine of such luxury, apart from the Moscato, that can compete with Nasco for its wonderful delicacy, for its sweets fragrances and the supreme armony of its body…."
The wine production comes from a few dozens of hectares only: this variety isn't a good producer of grapes and has a low resistance to diseases.
The growing zones for this variety are situated in the eastern part of Cagliari province, in the Campidano plane (province of Oristano) and in districts of Mandrolisai and Alghero for quite some time now.
Grapes are harvested over ripe and a little passito, in order to obtain a higher concentration of natural sugar.
The aging required is of 9 months, and it comes in different typologies; the type "Riserva" has 2 years of aging (1 year in cask):
Sweet, White;
Liqueur-like Sweet Natural, White;
Riserva: Liqueur-like Sweet Natural, White;
Liqueur-like Dry, White;
Riserva: Liqueur-like Dry, White;
Dry, White.

NURAGUS

Nuragus is one of the oldest grape variety in Sardinia.
Some experts believe that it's been brought to the island during the XII century b.C. by Phoenicians; others believe that it's a native variety because its name is really similar to the famous neolithic stone contruction of Nuraghi; it's though it spread from the upper Marmilla, all around Nuoro province, to Trexenta and Parteolla up to the plains of Oristano and Cagliari, to the Sulcis-Inglesiente area.
It's always been a variety able to adapt to all kind of grounds, to bear most of the parasites and to guarantee good results in fructification: for this reason it's known as "pagadeppidus"(pay debts), "preni tineddus"(fill up vats), and "ua de is paberus"(poorman's grapes).
The excessive production gave a wine too much alcoholic, missing body and armony: this is why all wine-growers and all wine producers, with the help of experts and modern technologies have known to bring the best out of this wine without changing its nature.
Nuragus is a cool gentle wine, slightly acidic and at times slightly sparkling.
Other varieties which complete it never exceed 15%.
It doesn't need aging period and it comes in following types:
Dry, White;
Sweet, White;
Dry Sparkling, White;
Sweet Sparkling, White.

VERMENTINO DI GALLURA

The grape-variety Vermentino arrived from Corse during the XIX century b.C.: from then on it became widely known in the island: wines are very pleasant and always different in taste, depending on the cultivation area they grow in.
The Vermentino which grows in Gallura zone gives a very typical wine: granitic soils of growth and the mistral wind contribute to create a very particular taste: it's the only sardinian wine that obtained the DOCG (Denominazione d'Origine Controllata e Garantita).
Whenever people think of a sardinian white wine, they come up with Vermentino, this is how famous it is, and the district of Gallura is considered the most famous area to grow this grape.
The Gallura production area is situated between the internal zone of Sassari province and the northern part of Nuoro province; it includes towns like Aggius, Olbia, Calangianus, Arzachena, Berchidda, Tempio Pausania, San Teodoro and Budoni.
The most special type is "Superiore", with an alcool content of 14° and a very fruity and mellow taste; the normal one is fresh, with white flowers fragrances, slightly more acid than the first.
Grape-varieties which can complete this wine are not more than 15%.
No aging is required.

VERMENTINO DI SARDEGNA

The grape-variety Vermentino arrived in Sardinia from Corse during the XIX century b.C.: from then on it became widely grown everywhere in the island: wines are very pleasant and always different in taste, depending on the cultivation area of the vine.
The wine Vermentino is for excellence the Sardinian white wine: whenever we think of a sardinian white wine, we definitely think of Vermentino.
Actually the Vermentino D.O.C. is the richest and most diffused D.O.C. in the island: the range of wines of all sardinian wineries gets always this wine, also in different typologies.
Vermentino di Sardegna, unlike Vermentino di Gallura, comes from a grape-variety cultivated in more fertile and richer soils.
These wines are always different because there are small quantities of other recommended grape-varieties (Chardonnay, Pinot, Sauvignon) which underline the main characteristics of Vermentino, as fresh and dry taste, a small acidity and a light bitter final.
The aging is not required and there is only one type: white, dry.

VERNACCIA

The Vernaccia is the oldest wine of Sardinia, obtained by the same grape-variety.
Nobody could be sure about its origins; we know that during the Ancient Roman Empire the grape was called "Vernacula" that means "local grape", but this name was given also to grapes of uncertain origins.
The legend tells Santa Giusta, the saint protector of these lands, had come down from the sky to her land struck by malaria, and she had cried seeing the unhappy condition of her village and its people.
As she was crying, her tears had been felling on the ground where plants plenty of fruits started to come up, so people being afraid of these plants disappearing began to pick the fruits and to press them into big jars.
Sick people got cured after drinking a drop of this juice and the malaria was wiped out: another possible name, in fact, could be "vernum" that means "spring", to remember the moment these people were "reborn".
The Vernaccia production area is the High Tirso valley where lands are distinguished in "Gregori"(higher and drier lands) and "Bennaxi"(this ground was marshy for a long time and now the more fertile) where the best product comes from.
There's a special method of wine-making, completely different from the traditional one.
During the harvest, terracotta containers especially produced in Oristano are used to pick the grapes, in order to avoid waisting the must: grapes skin, in fact, is very thin.
At the beginning of its life the wine is without "character", its colour's pale , its taste's slight; in spring time , after the filtration it develops more marked and typical characterics.
After two years in casks it's a very good wine with fragrances of almonds , very good to serve with fish.
At this point the aging can go on up to ten years in half-empty casks, where a layer of yeasts protects and allows the wine to develop, until it becomes one of the more appreciated dessert or aperitif wines around the world.
Its colours goes from amber to golden yellow; its fragrance's ethereal and fragrant, its taste's very warm.
It's a meditation and conversation wine, very good also at the end of a meal with almond desserts.
The minimum aging required is two years; it comes in different typologies:
Dry, White, aging of 2 years;
Riserva: Dry, White, aging of 4 years minimum;
Superiore (minimum 15.5°): Dry, White, aging of 3 years minimum;
Sweet Liqueur-like, White, aging of 2 years;
Riserva Liqueur-like: Sweet, White, aging of 4 years minimum;
Superiore Liqueur-like: Sweet, White, aging of 3 years;
Secco Liqueur-like: Dry, White, aging of 2 years;
Riserva Secco Liqueur-like: Dry, White, aging of 4 years minimum;
Superiore Secco Liqueur-like: Dry, White, aging of 3 years.

THE HISTORY OF THE WINE IN SARDINIA

The vine is in Sardinia from time out of mind: according to different experts, the Semites, the Cretans and the Phoenicians would have import it during the staying in the island, but now the certanty of spontaneity has replaced definitively this theory.
Confirmation comes from the results of researches in prehistoric sites, where precious grape-pips have been found in different nuraghi stratifications.
The Phoenicians were installed in coastal zones of Cagliari, of Sulcis area, of Sinis area; they've taken advantage by the geographic position to increase their trades in the Mediterranean basin.
Greeks (VII century b.C.) did the same but they arrived after the Phoenicians.
After these two civilisations, the Carthaginians arrived; at the beginning they destroyed many vineyards to protect wines of their native land but, finally, they increased the cultivation and the vine became the most important cultivation in colonies such as Karalis, Tharros, Cornus, Nora and Olbia.
We have several finds of punic period: among these, wine amphoras founds in Cagliari's necropolis.
We also know that Amilcare (Annibale's son and a very fierce enemy of the Romans) would have come here to stay and cultivate the vine.
About the Romans, we know that they appreciated very much sardinian wine, so in all the houses there was a wine cellar.
One of the most precious finds of roman imperial period is a tastevin for sommelier; it has been found in the nuraghe complex of Orroli and has been classified by the archaeologist Sauges; it can be admired in the archaeological museum of Nuoro.
Strabone too exalted the island especially for its white wines: in this period we find the Vernaccia wine with the name "Vernacula", the name given to the local grape-variety.
But, in spite of the wine success, the government preferred the cultivation of corn so that sardinia was called "The granary of Rome".
Between the barbaric invasions and the early middles ages the cultivation of vine passed through a collapse, although protection's and incentive's attempts by the Byzantines who brought the malvasia vine and by monastic orders who grew vines in small areas.
The judical period (XII-XIII c.a.C.) finally gave a real expansion of vine growing.
In fact, according to "Carta de Logu" (a law collection made to renew the sardinian administration) in 1392 we read as it follows: Anybody has uncultivated lands, has to be obliged by a royal servant to set a vineyard up in one year time, or he must sell the land or must give it to someone who grow it…".
Vineyards not properly cultivated were considerated "outlaw"and the man who secretly had take away a vineyard payed a dear fine: he had to pay back the cost of damage and if he should have not payed, his right hand was amputated and he had to pass a long period in jail!
These beneficial measures brought about an environmental improvement with an economic expansion.
Genoeses and Tuscans increased important business with Sardinia and enriched the island with new species of vines as well as Spanish who arrived later but they devoted themself to destroy instead to increase the value of sardinian vineyards.
 The treatise of Andrea Bracci (written in 1596), "De Naturali Vinorum Historia" describes sardinian wine as quality wine and the isle "Sardinia, insula vini", not only for its perfect geographic position in the middle of Mediterraneo, but also for its climate and soil typology.
Unfortunately, he follows, "Sardinian people don't drink much wine because they're not accustomed to delicate tastes, so most of all they prefer to drink water; for this
reason does not astonish that sardinian people don't plant vineyards and don't have growing vines apart from arboreal vines used to obtain a rustic wine".
If we want find a synonym to describe this first part of sardinian wine history we think straight away to the ups and downs of a swing!
During these times our beautiful island adapted itself to history, traditions, culture and to wills of people who have lived there, who have destroyed or increased its value.
We close this first part with piemontese domination in the course of which we have the re-flourish of vine stopped, this time, by the tragic invasion of phylloxera.
We are at the end of 1800: Sardinia had 80.000 hectares of excellent vineyards completely destroyed because of disease.

TODAY

Today the viticulture is the most important arboreal cultivation in Sardinia, whether for profit (about 60 thousand million liras for year) or for diffusion in all towns.
Up to 20 years ago the production was remarkable but wine was often sold outside Sardinia and it was used to complete the structure and the alcoholic content of "weak" wines.
During the last 15 years the situation is changed and the wine has become symbole of culture and civilization: there's an improvement about selection of better areas and of best species of vines, the better yeld for each hectare, the resumption of traditional wine-makings using modern technology, the refining into cask for ageing wines.
Wine-producers and co-operative societies have the goal of quality, improvement and respect for the product, so wine becomes the best expression of the earth and in the same time it can satisfy modern consumer's taste.
The quantity produced is drastically reduced for the new wine's politic of CEE for explants (without the possibility of re-set-up): from 75 thousand hectares in 1970 to the 25 thousand of today.
The production of 2.5 millions of hectolitres fell down to 800 thousand hectolitres, enough to cover only the 60% of internal needs.
Altough those numbers, sardinian wine gets very positive results worldwide: both bottled wine (6.5 millions) and unpacked wine which is used to improve wines of more famous zones in the world.

(Text Source: www.lestradedelvino.com )

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Top Destinations

Pula South Sardinia
€23
Golfo Aranci Only 18 km north of Olbia
€34
Stintino Northwest Sardinia
€24
Torre delle Stelle Southeast Sardinia between Cagliari and Villasimius
€26
Palau Northeast Sardinia
€17